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Author Topic: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI  (Read 12200 times)

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« on: June 19, 2011, 10:38 pm »
Hey guys! My name is Sydney and I hail from a small town called Elm Grove, Wisconsin. I’m a biomedical engineering major doubling with applied mathematics and statistics. I love to talk, so how 'bout you start chatting up my forum? Ok. Great. Wonderful. :)

I chose Hopkins at first because of its amazing biomedical engineering program, but since coming here, I have done nothing but find more reasons to support my decision. The research opportunities, community outreach, and vibrant student body are things that I honestly cannot believe that another college has. Also, I love the freedom of no core classes. (Can you say bye-bye history classes? Because I sure did.)
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Fall 2010
Physics I + lab
BME Modeling and Design
Expository Writing: High Culture, Pop Culture
Linear Algebra

Spring 2011
Physics II + lab
Probability and Statistics for the Biological Sciences and Engineering
BME Design Team
Intro to Java + lab
BME in the Real World

Fall 2011
Organic Chem I
Organic Chem Lab
Molecules and Cells
Intro to Fiction and Poetry I
Research for Credit

Spring 2012
Organic Chem II
Systems and Controls
Models and Simulations
Intro to Fiction and Poetry II

Fall 2012
Systems Bioengineering I
Systems Bioengineering I lab
Optimization I
Biomaterials I
Intermediate Spanish II

Spring 2013
Systems Bioengineering II
Systems Bioengineering II lab
Optimization II
Mathematical Modeling & Consulting
Design for the Stage

Fall 2013
Systems Bioengineering III
Statistical Mechanics & Thermodynamics
Theater: Tech Direction
BME Design Team Leader
--------------------
My Activities

Student Admissions Advisory Board: Have you read my blogs? Well, I get to do that for all you lovely readers due to this group! I also can chat with y’all, answer questions, and see your lovely faces at the Hopkins Open Houses. Sounds great, right? It sure is!

Engineering Ambassadors: Wanna see the cool stuff at Hopkins? By that, I mean the engineering labs, of course. You’re in luck! In this club, we give tours to prospective students and show them the behind-the-scenes stuff at Hopkins. We’ll also eat lunch with you if you have a lot of questions! I really love this group.

SHARE: One of the best things about Hopkins is the proximity to the Hopkins Hospital. In SHARE, I go down to the hospital and sort donated medical supplies so that they can be shipped to countries all around the world.

Elementary School Mentoring: Through two different groups on campus (Hop Help and Story Pals), I have been able to mentor adorable little elementary school kids in Baltimore.

National Society of Collegiate Scholars: I was inducted as a sophomore, and as a group, our goals are to promote volunteering and academic success, not only in the college environment, but in our community. I currently serve as president, and have previously served as the PACE (or community service) chair.

Tau Beta Pi: I was inducted into this engineering honor society as one of the few female members, and I am currently the only female member on the board, serving as the corresponding secretary. (Can you say girl power?)
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Dorm Life

As a freshman, I lived in McCoy and I LOVED it. I had a huge single on the bottom floor, conveniently located right next to the laundry room and ten steps from the front door of the building. Also, since not many freshmen are in McCoy, we all formed a tight-knit bond. It was like my second family. Additionally, I firmly believe suite-style living is the way to go. You can be social when you want to be, but when you have a huge physics test, you can shut your door.

As a sophomore, I lived in Charles Commons. Our suite had four single rooms, a large living room, a kitchen, and two bathrooms. We were also attached to the mailroom, a mini gym, and Nolan's, where sophomore get their food. Fantastic? I think so.

Now, I live in an off-campus apartment, and it is sooooo nice. I have more room and tons of color to keep my living space snazzy.
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

JHU_Admin

  • Administrator
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2011, 12:23 pm »
A series of questions and answers previously posted to JHU_Sydney's thread accidentally were removed. Here they are now:


Posted by KateBellile on July 3, 2011
Quote
Hello Sydney! My name is Kate, and I'm also from Wisconsin, Appleton to be exact. I visited Hopkins last summer and I absolutely loved it, and I really want to go there, but I am concerned about all the traveling that would require. Do you find that you get to go home as much as you would like?
Thanks!
~Kate


Appleton! Last year I went to see the Hopkins baseball team play there. :)

Now, I find I go home as much as I need to. I was worried about it at first, which I feel is normal for most kids moving across the country. But I went home Thanksgiving, December/January, and Spring Break. My parents also came up for stuff like parent's weekend and mother's day (my dad's present to her was to see me lol). Three times may not seem like a lot, but honestly, if you want, you can stay home for nearly a month and a half in December/January, and there is SOOOO much going on, time really flies!

In my opinion, I am glad I chose to go to college far away. I feel like I learned a lot about myself, and at the same time, had the comfort of being able to transfer near home if ABSOLUTELY necessary. But really, nobody who comes to the Hop wants to leave it. :)

Feel free to keep the questions coming!

***********************************************************************************

Posted by Eric on July 12, 2011
Quote
Hey Sydney!

My name is Eric, and I'm a rising high school senior from Taipei American School in Taiwan. I'm interested in studying Biomedical Engineering as a major, and Johns Hopkins immediately comes to my mind. I was wondering what the courses are like under the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Also, have you thought about what you are going to do with your BME degree after JHU?

The BME program just sounds amazing here, and I can't wait to hear more about it from your reply!

Thanks!
- Eric

Hey Eric!

The BME courses in general are very hands-on. I mean, the first class you take as a freshman, modeling and design, is an almost entirely interactive class with small groups of five working on individual projects and reporting the unique data. And second semester, I took a class called design team where I got to work on a REAL project, aiming for a patent. Our team was sponsored by a Hopkins hospital doctor, and to make something for him was so incredibly rewarding as well as the only way to really know what engineering is like. It really amazed me that I was able to gain this experience as a freshman.

I'm actually pre-med, but I chose engineering because I'm really interested in orthopedics as well as computer-integrated surgery, both of which share many characteristics of engineering.

Feel free to keep the questions coming. 

***********************************************************************************

Posted by akallen40 on July 18, 2011
Quote
Sydney,

My son will be a freshman in BME this year. His dorm is Wolman. We are trying to decide which meal plan would suit him best. He doesn't think that it'll be a problem to walk to Fresh Food Cafe a few times per day, so he wants the anytime plan with the least number of dining dollars. Do you have an opinion on this?

Thanks!

Hi!

My personal opinion is that the 14 meals per week is a better deal when living in Wolman or McCoy (I lived in McCoy which is right next to Wolman), though some disagree. I don't eat like a teenage boy, but I sleep like one, and not once could I muster the energy to go to breakfast at FFC. The only times were when I went to brunch on weekends, but even then, FFC doesn't open until 10 on weekends so most kids only ate there twice a day those days. Also, with the extra dining dollars, I was able to grab Einstein's Bagels for breakfast, which is actually attached to Wolman, and it has bagels, oatmeal, parfaits, etc.

That being said, meal swipes can also be used to get a meal in a minute, which is attached to wolman, and you can use a meal swipe to get a cereal cup, pre-packaged sandwich, etc. So he doesn't necessarily need the dining dollars even if he is lazy in the morning like I am.

So overall, I have to say that I liked my meal plan option (14 meals + 250 dollars per semester). Most kids in my dorm grabbed Chipotle once a week, cooked some, used our dining dollars at the nearby nolan's, and got sushi with our dining dollars at charmar (attached to Wolman) on a regular basis. I didn't even usually use my full 14. I felt like my plan allowed me to have more variety, but I also probably don't eat as much as your son, so he may need quantity over quality.

You should also note that during the first month or so, he has the option of switching meal plans, so if he starts with unlimited, then realizes that he likes mornings as much as I do (note the sarcasm), he can switch.

Feel free to ask me more questions! Can't wait to meet all the new BMEs next year! 

***********************************************************************************

Posted by vaishnavi5 on July 27, 2011
Quote
Hey Sydney!

I am a rising senior, and I would really like to be able to come to JHU. Right now, I am either considering majoring in BME or neuroscience.

Here are a couple of my questions.

I noticed that you had a Java class. Does it help to have prior comp. sci. knowledge at all? Do the students use computer programs a lot in biomedical engineering?
After completing some time at JHU, what was it that appealed to you most about BME? Has your perspective of biomed changed any since you first arrived?
What types of classes prepared you best when you arrived to JHU?

Thank you so much! It really helps a lot! 

Hi! I'm glad to hear you are considering BME. I love it. :)

I think it helps to have prior knowledge in any class before taking it, whether it be programming or math or science or history. That being said, when it comes to programming, I knew absolutely nothing. And I survived. There are a lot of free resources at JHU when it comes to getting help. In almost every type of engineering (with the exception of ChemBE) there is some programming involved. BME, depending on the track you take, can have lots of programming or minimal amounts of programming. Either way, some programming will be involved.

Since coming to JHU, the thing I like the most about BME is how hands-on it is. I mean, first semester, you already start off with hands-on projects, and for the last project, they even let you pick the topic (my group analyzed how much work is done to send texts on different cellphones...we won and our poster is actually being hung up in the BME building!). Then second semester, I got to work for a real sponsor/client to make and patent a product for them in a group of ten with upperclassmen leading the way. I feel like in a year I have had more exposure to my major than I would have in four years at some other schools. The fact that engineering is so interactive is what made me choose it.

My perspective of BME has not changed since coming to Hopkins, but I sort of feel like I knew what I was getting my self into. Some kids focus on the "biomedical" part rather than the "engineering" before coming to Hopkins. Just a warning: math and technology are involved, which happen to be two of my favorite things. :)

As far as preparing for BME, any science or math courses are good preparation. Programming skills may help, but most kids come in without any.

Feel free to ask more questions! :)

***********************************************************************************

Posted by dorykong on July 30, 2011
Quote
Hello Sydney!

I am Dory from China, and I love to come to JHU. But the fact is that not much Chinese students actually go to JHU because the competition is very furious, and JHU is just like a mystery for us. Anyway, I will definitely have a try this year.
I am also a "science-philic" girl who loves BME and especially Biophysics.
I am very interested in some specific research programmes available to freshman or sophomore that you find interesting. Is that possible for some freshmen to involve into some research at JHU?
I highly value the "hands-on" conception about science, and I have the same sort of questions as that of the last student: are most BME projects based on computer, or IT?

Thank you very much for helping me out~

Hi Dory! I'm glad to hear you are applying! I actually have quite a few friends from Shanghai and Hong Kong. :)

Research at JHU is always an option, no matter whether you are a freshman or senior. Between all the research going on at the Homewood Campus and the Hopkins Hospital, the opportunities are everywhere. It is literally as easy as emailing some professors who run the labs and expressing your interest, and seeing who needs help. I have many friends who started research as a freshman. :)

Hands-on versus computer based projects depend a lot on your track. As a BME, you can follow four tracks: biological systems engineering, computational biology, sensors/microsystems/instrumentation, or cell/tissue/biomaterials. All of them involve some computer-based projects, but a track like computational will stress them a lot more. Other tracks will also require programming, but may be a more hands on.

No matter the track, you all start out as freshmen with very hands-on projects. My first semester we made lots of things to grasp the basics on engineering, and then second semester I worked to design a real project in a group of upperclassmen, so I'd say at Hopkins, hands-on engineering is a very large component. I really appreciate the opportunities I've been given in that respect.

Feel free to ask me any more questions! I loveeeeee answering them! :)

***********************************************************************************

Posted by dorykong on August 4, 2011
Quote
Hi Sydney!

Thank you very much for your thorough advices~I am Dory again~:)

Other than some research work, I am also interested in JHU club activities. Often there are too many clubs that dazzle my mind. Could you tell about some really famous clubs in JHU? Actually I love Japanese animation and piano-playing, so I will be excited to find some clubs focus on that~
I am also curious about the difference between a high shool club and a club in university-I just have no conception about the latter.

In fact I have heard that at JHU, students can take the chance to do some voluntary work in hospital even they are not studying medicine-is that true? How often do students do their voluntary work and usually for what kind of work?

Thank you very much Sydney, and sorry that I am just so excited that I have asked so many questions once a time...:)

Hi Dory!

As far as activities go, Hopkins has options for everybody! Check out the activities website here:http://johnshopkins.collegiatelink.net/organizations! I know for piano there are lots of different musical things to do, especially because Hopkins has the Peabody Conservatory, a school for serious musicians that we have the option of taking lessons at! I'm not going to lie; I'm too sure about Japanese animation clubs, but Hopkins is really nice in the fact it is pretty easy to start a club yourself! This year I know a cheerleading club was started, so it is possible to create a club!

As far as "famous" clubs, I'd have to go with Octopodes, which is an a capella group that is actually on a tv competition of some sort (or so facebook tells me...lol). I love Vocal Chords, Mental Notes, and All-Nighters, too. :) Another really popular club is the the Baltimore Tutorial project, which is where Hopkins students tutor little adorable kids...right on campus!

And there are volunteering opportunities at the hospital, definitely! You generally just go through the hospital itself (not necessarily through our school) and apply to be an adult volunteer! Since the hospital is so easily accessible, there are many ways to get involved, not only at the hospital, but the community itself. :)

And everybody, keep the questions coming!

**********************************************************************************

Posted by kristina11 on August 15, 2011
Quote
Hey Sydney! I'm a freshman BME, and I was wondering if you could tell me more about the modeling and design class. Also, I heard that teachers are really chill if you are wait listed into their class, and you talk to them about it. I was wait listed into the BME class section, and I was wondering if the previous statement still applies. One of my friends said that there are 5 people to a group, but last year he knew people that had 6 to a group? Could you clarify/ elaborate? Thanks! (:

Hey Kristina!

BME Modeling and Design was definitely one of my favorite classes. You are in groups of four or five working on projects together for the whole semester, so it really let you meet close friends early on. There is a lot of freedom in the class, as well as a lot of hands on activity. If you have any more questions about the content itself, feel free to ask more questions. I don't want to babble (I tend to write a lot lol). :)

You can email the professor and ask, though it may be hard to get in off the waitlist for a small section such as this. You share your advisor with your group of five, so they may want to keep it spaced out. Also, I knew a couple groups of four from last year, but no groups of six (there may have been one like your friend said, but I doubt there was more than one). They really try to keep it to a maximum of five since they are all group projects and want to keep the workload the same for each student. If there are no sections that fit into your schedule other than the one that is waitlisted, you can email the professor and then they will most likely allow it (professors are very understanding in that respect). If you do want to contact the professor, I would contact them now though.

That being said, lots of classes are Hopkins are pretty "chill" as far as getting in off the waitlist, especially the bigger classes. I have had lots of friends show up the first day of a waitlisted class and brought a slip to the professor to be signed so they could add it. Professors are really cool! Just the smaller the class, the harder it is to squeeze people in.

Feel free to ask more questions! And you are going to have some fun years as a BME; trust me. :)

***********************************************************************************

Posted by bwolin on September 4, 2011
Quote
Hi Syndey-
I am a senior at Lincoln Park High School in Chicago and applying to JHU. I'm interested in becoming a biomedical engineer however, most of my life I wanted to be a pre-med so I'm similar to you in the way that I think I may pursue both in a way! What is your advice for admissions- I hear the BME program is very selective. Thanks!

Brianna

Hey Brianna!

In all honesty, I am not involved in the admissions process, so I can't really give you any advice in that respect. I'm still wondering how I got in! Hopkins is such a great place; I've made the best friends I could ever have (I'm in the middle of girl talk with my suitemate right now! lol), and it is such a great atmosphere. It's amazing to think that I could have been so lucky.

But it's exciting to hear you are considering BME! I love it. Engineering isn't generally considered one of the normal pre-med majors, but a good portion of BMEs are pre-meds because even though it is challenging, it is just so rewarding. I feel like I'll be a better doctor because of the experiences I've had as a Hopkins BME, from speaking in front of very important people, to the in-depth study of how everything works from both physical and biological aspects.

Ask me anything else you might have! I always love when I hear from kids from the midwest! :)


Yarelix15

  • Newbie
Hi Sydney!
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2011, 12:54 am »
I had a question. I got accepted into the BME major, and I am as nervous as I am excited. My high school is the type of high school that requires us to take the honors courses before taking the AP classes, so I never took AP biology or AP physics (just honors), and I am taking AP chemistry now. The only class I was able to do ahead of time was AP calculus since my school doesn't offer honors calculus.

Do you think I'll be at a major disadvantage my first year? Is there something that you recommend to do, such as prepare for a subject (say Physics, since I took it a year ago and the course was not very rigorous)?

Thanks!

-Yarelix.

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2011, 08:05 pm »
Hi Yarelix!

No, you won't be at a disadvantage. Yes, many kids have a lot of their AP credits out of the way, but they design the program assuming you have no AP credits. If you check the link below, it has a hypothetical 4 year plan that shows how you can do it without the credits.

http://www.bme.jhu.edu/academics/ugrad/docs/BME-Undergrad-Curriculum-Overview.pdf

I took Physics at the Hop without having anything other than honors, and I feel like all entry level courses are fair, no matter where you come from. :)

Feel free to ask me anything else!

Sydney :)
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

compounder123

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2011, 03:31 pm »
Hi,
    I have been accepted to the BME major this year and had a couple of questions for you.
1. How much AP credit can you get and for what courses? I am an international student and I can give a couple of AP's after my senior year if that would help.
2. I have been reading up about the 4 focus areas, and am interested in the Biological Systems Engineering focus area. I think that is the your focus area too. I want to know whether this focus  area would also help me prepare for Med school?
3. I was looking up the different dorms and have decided that I want to either live in Wolman or AMR II, which one would you suggest given that I am BME( i.e which would be closer to the BME department building/ the place I will be taking most of my classes) ?

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2011, 09:30 pm »
Merry Christmas! :)

So, let me tackle those questions:

1. I do not believe there is a limit to how many AP credits you can receive, but the most common/helpful ones for BME majors are AP Chem, AP Physics C, AP Calculus, and possibly Java (I'm not 100% on the last one's relevance to our requirements, but I think it counts for our programming requirement). All those classes are classes that you get to skip as a freshman if you have AP credit for them. I AP'ed out of Chem, Calculus, and got some credits transferred from a local college for other math classes, and it helped me lessen my course load as a freshman. That being said, I know a lot of kids who either re-took the classes or didn't have the credits, so don't worry too hard!

Check out this link for other classes you can get credit for, even though they aren't major requirements: http://apply.jhu.edu/apply/apib.html

2. Yes! Systems is my track. I'm pre-med, but I didn't choose the systems track because of it. I chose systems because it allowed me to take a lot of math and materials science classes (It's safe to say it is the most flexible of all the tracks). Ironically, I sort of feel it isn't as "biology" based as, say, the cell/tissue/biomat track even though systems is technically Systems Biology. All of the pre-med requirements except for orgo II and orgo lab are actually required for all of the tracks, so don't pick your focus area based on pre-med. I'd recommend figuring it out after freshman year, or even after sophomore! (You don't really need to know your track until junior year.)

3. In all honestly, it is probably a tie for the closeness to buildings. For instance, AMRs will we right next to bloomberg for physics and ffc for meals, but it will be much farther away from the engineering quad for math. The walk to remsen for chemistry is approx. the same from either dorm. I highly recommend just choosing whichever dorm you want to live in most; trust me, it will matter much more than the walk, especially since you can get across the whole campus by foot in 15 minutes. But do note: you cannot apply to AMR II without applying to AMR I, unless they changed it from my year. So if you are putting the AMRs as your first choice, they can put you in either dorm.

Keep the questions coming, guys! :)
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

compounder123

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2011, 10:17 am »
Belated Merry Christmas and Advance Happy New Year ! :p
So on average how many hours of class did you have per week as a freshman? I know this might have varied a lot, but it would be really helpful  if you could provide an estimate.
Additionally, which would be the normal Science related courses a freshman BME student would be expected to take?
Thank you in advance !

compounder123

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2011, 10:27 am »
I was reading the Hopkins Forums about AP credits and I have another question.
Are there any departmental placement exams for the incoming freshmen ( in departments like Physics , Chem, Bio etc) like there are for languages like Latin to help freshmen determine which course they should take? ( I read about this in the forum)
I'm asking this because I will graduate in March and unless the AP credits help, I don't want to sit to study all over again for the AP's !
Thank you again !

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2011, 09:53 pm »
Hi again!

No, I do not believe there are departmental placement exams except for math (but the math exam is more to see if you lucked out and got a passing score on the AP but should start at a lower level I believe). That being said, I don't believe you get the credit if you place higher than your AP test score/don't take the AP test, but in all honesty, I could be wrong because I everyone I know either had AP credit or started at Calc 1. I would call academic advising. But for physics and chem, you have to take the AP test.

As far as normal courses for a freshman BME, check out this link: http://www.bme.jhu.edu/academics/ugrad/docs/BME-Undergrad-Curriculum-Overview.pdf. It all depends on AP credits, though. I only took 14 credits first semester and 17 second semester, and I got to pick a few electives, so my schedule didn't really look like that.

Hmmm. Homework as a freshman? I had a good amount of homework, but it really depends. Like first semester I was in physics and we had a problem set each week. It probably took me like 7 hours...but I always did it in the common room on Saturdays, so I wasn't very focused... Lol. In expos, we had something due every class that took anywhere from 30 minutes to a couple of hours/days (papers!!). In BME modeling and design, you had like 5 big lab reports, and those took a really long time to do in groups, but in between the big things the workload was lighter. Physics lab has no homework. And linear algebra had a problem set due every week and a quiz every week (well, my section did. other sections didn't.) I spent probably the majority of my working time studying for that class. And in between the homework, I studied quite a bit during the week just to keep up in my classes and went to a lot of office hours (college is no place for cramming). That being said, this was a very light semester for me, and the following semester my workload increased a lot, mainly because I am not the world's best programmer. It really depends on what you take and what you are naturally inclined at. I know some kids who did the physics homework in 2 hours flat (they are super smart!!!). All in all, it was completely manageable if you're organized, and I still had lots of time for friends and fun.

Feel free to ask me anything else! :)
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

compounder123

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2011, 01:32 pm »
Hi,
    I have a couple of questions (again!):
1. I guess I will take the AP's this year, so keeping in mind that I will major in BME, the AP Physics C ( E&M) exam would be the correct choice, but would taking the AP Physics C ( Mechanics ) test be of any use?
2. I am still confused between Wolman and AMR II, could you enlighten me on a couple of differences between the two ? ( apart from the fact that wolman has a kitchenette )
Thanks again!

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2011, 02:10 pm »
Hey!

1. I believe you need to take both because we take two semesters of Physics (one on mechanics and one on E&M), so it would make sense you need both. (http://apply.jhu.edu/apply/apib.html) But these are the types of questions to call advising with. I'm not sure, and since I'm just a student, I don't know everything about credit transfers and don't want to say the wrong thing. Sorry I can't help more! :)

2. This I can answer! The main differences are AMR II has common bathrooms/showers you have to share with your floor, no air conditioning, and no kitchenette. It is also located on the freshman quad, so it is right near FFC and the gym. Wolman is suite style so you share your bathroom/shower with 3 other people, and you also have a little kitchenette and air conditioning. Also, Wolman isn't located on the freshman quad, but it is attached to Charles Street Market, so that's a plus. It's also undergoing a renovation right now, so that's exciting! But again, I just want to stress the fact that you keep saying AMR II, but when you apply to the AMRs, you apply to both I and II (or at least that was how it worked when I applied), even though a lot of people want II since it is a little newer I think. Just something to think about.

Keep the questions coming, everybody! :)
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

hleverson

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2012, 09:14 pm »
Hey Sydney!

I'm also from the small village of Elm Grove, Wisconsin! I'm sure our paths have crossed in the past, but apparently we didn't meet formally, yet. So, nice to meet you, Sydney, I'm Hannah!

I applied to JH and set up an interview to show my interest and, with hope, give myself an edge against other prospective students. It's this Saturday, and I'm really nervous.. Did you have an interview? If so (and if not) do you have any helpful hints?

Thanks!

Hannah

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2012, 10:29 am »
Hey Hannah! It's nice to see EG representing. I have a couple friends from East (which is where I went to high school) applying to the Hop this year, and I'm super excited. So many Wisconsin people! :)

I did have an interview...but for Hopkins, I feel like my interview wasn't typical. I talk about it in my summer contest blog (http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/guest/2010/08/you-have-arrived-at-your-destination/). My interview was actually three hours long on the night of senior ball...lol. She was pretty young so it sort of just turned into us chatting about Gilmore Girls and other pop culture things...Yea, that didn't happen in any of my other interviews. But as far as the interview goes, there are a couple things I recommend looking back.

1. Dress appropriately. You want to dress to impress, but for some interviews, if the interviewer is meeting you in a coffee shop and says it's casual, he means it, and you may be out of place in a big dress suit ensemble (though still dress nice). This really depends on the interviewer, though. Just make sure it is something you're comfortable in, as well as that it presents the impression you want to make.

2. Just be yourself. When I got nervous in my first couple interviews, I would just start talking about all my extracurriculars and academic awards. But the interviewer is trying to see beyond your stats. They want to see your personality and who you are off paper. I feel like my most successful interviews were ones like Hopkins where I relaxed a little and allowed the conversation to just flow.

3. Realize that the interviewer (in most cases) isn't trying to intimidate you. Yea, I had one or two ask me tricky, weird questions, but in all honesty, most of my interviewers said to me "I'm so excited that someone from the area is applying!". Interviewers are often just regular folks like ourselves. So relax.

All in all, just be yourself. College applications are like dating; you're gonna try to "flirt" with and impress all the schools, but if they don't like you back, then they don't deserve you anyway. :)

Feel free to ask me any other questions you have! Go EG! :)
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

Colleen

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2012, 10:25 pm »
Hey, my name is Colleen and I am a sophomore in high school. I am doing JHU in my school's annual honors english college fair. I was just wondering about a few things and thought you would b a great person to ask.
1) What do you like most about Johns Hopkin's? Least?
2)What are the social highlights of the year? 
3) and, finally, what are the pros and cons of living on campus or off campus?
These are the only questions that I could come up with that I couldn't find anywhere else on the forums.
Thanks for your time! And if you have any recommendations for me that could help make my project as authentic as possible, please let me know.
Hope to hear from you soon!

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #14 on: February 16, 2012, 03:42 pm »
Hey Colleen!

1. The think the thing I like most about JHU is the community. You are in a group of like-minded individuals-they are so many ambitious, charismatic people that it makes my learning experience and social life the best it can possibly be. I feel like it has an atmosphere that I can call home :) The thing I like the least is that we have first semester covered grades, but in all honesty, it is most people's favorite thing. Our first semester GPA doesn't count towards our total GPA in order to ease the transition into college life. Since I did really well first semester freshmen year, I wish that medical schools could see that.

2. The biggest social highlight is Spring Fair. It is a weekend where there are food vendors, games, craft carts, jewelry vendors, and everything in between. This year, Passion Pit is even rumored (or possibly confirmed, I'm not sure lol) to be coming! There is so many fun things going on during that time. It's just insane. Also, homecoming is a pretty big deal here because we do it in the spring for lacrosse instead of the fall for football. Everybody goes out to the nest! (The nest= our lacrosse field.  Blue Jays go to the nest... lol)

3. Living on campus is great because you are close to everything-classes, food, social functions, etc. I also like it because dorm life is really active and there are SO many events- just the other day there was "make your own jewelry box"...for a dorm of like 600 people! The one thing that some kids aren't a fan of is that in most dorms, you need to buy a meal plan....but not gonna lie-I love my meal plan! lol Living off campus can be great, too, especially because there are many apartments near campus. I've also heard it is a little cheaper to live off campus, so that is an added bonus. The main struggle with off-campus housing is you have to take care of yourself a lot more-you have to pay utilities, rent, etc. and your RA isn't going to tell your roommate to settle down.

I hope that helps!

Sydney
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

dadler27

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #15 on: February 25, 2012, 12:00 pm »
Hi Sydney,


I'm also an incoming BME for this Fall.  I don't have a laptop of my own yet, and wanted to buy one but of course have it compatible for everything I do for Hopkins.  So, the famous question has arisen...Mac or PC? Just wondering what you've seen works best for people, if you knew any specific models that were great, and if I had any technology questions, who in the department I could talk to.


Thanks!


Dan

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2012, 02:39 pm »
Hi Dan!

So I had that question when I came to Hopkins, too. In all honesty? I don't think it really matters. I'd say about a little over half have PCs of some sort, and the rest have Macs. When I came, an upperclassman told me that Macs didn't always have compatible software for BME...but none of my friends have complained as of yet! Lol. It really comes down to personal preference. The only thing you need to be able to get onto your computer is really just a multitude of programming languages (Matlab being the most important and the one that is almost always used).  And even if it isn't compatible, we have a 24 hour computer lab with everything you could ever need.

The only tip I have is too make sure it isn't too big. I got a huge one so it would look cool when I worked in CAD only to find out 1. my classes do not require me to work in CAD and 2. It is sooooo heavy to carry around campus. :(

http://www.it.johnshopkins.edu/services/ << IT can probably help you with any other questions/compatibility issues. :)

Feel free to ask anything else! :)

Sydney
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

annie

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2012, 08:51 pm »
Hi Sydney!

Is it really difficult to learn computer programming? I've had zero experience with it, and I'm nervous that I'll be behind everyone else. Also, if I want to do things like stem cell research, genetics, and oncology, should I major in BME or just bio? And lastly, do you know anyone who's double majoring or major/minoring in BME and a language (French)? I definitely want to continue in French in college, but I don't know if it'll be too much to combine it with BME, especially since the fields are so different. I'd also really like to do some sort of study abroad program in France, but I don't know if that'll be possible with a BME major. And I'm also worried that doing BME/French instead of BME/some other science won't be as helpful with getting a job or finding good research opportunities.

Thank you!

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #18 on: April 03, 2012, 02:08 pm »
Hey Annie!

You start at beginning level programming, and I would say at least half the kids come in with no experience. Programming isn't my number one strength, but it is all very manageable. They ease you into it very nicely. :)

You can do either BME or biology if you want to do research in those areas. What I would recommend you do is check out the BME focus area cell and tissue engineering. Most of those topics fall into cell/tissue engineering, and there is some great research being done at Hopkins through the BME department in those areas! It sort of depends on what you want your approach to research to me. I would recommend trying out BME first just because you can't switch into BME once you come here, but you can always decide to leave the major if you decide it's not for you.

Lastly, I don't know any French/BME double majors, but I do know a few Spanish/BME double majors, so I assume double majoring in French wouldn't be a problem. The humanities credits from French would actually fulfill your distribution requirements as an engineer. For study abroad, most engineers use the Vredenburg Scholarship. I haven't studied abroad, so I don't know much about it, but I do know it makes studying abroad as an engineer very possible. I had a friend study abroad in New Zealand during the year, though most study abroad over summer. But don't worry about potential job opportunities due to your major in French-it won't hurt you at all and will make you stand out in the pack.

Sydney :)
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

miguel

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2012, 01:33 pm »
Hi Sidney! My name is Miguel and I'm from Lisbon, Portugal. I am a rising senior and visited JHU this summer, and absolutely loved it. I'm thinking of applying to BME, but I'm still not sure  - all I know is that my passion are the sciences, and biology in particular. I was wondering if you could answer a few questions for me:


For BME and when applying to JHU in general, is applying ED preferred? In other words, I know both ED and RD applicants are considered equally, but for such a specialized major as BME, where you apply separately, is it recommended that you apply ED? If I may ask, did you?

What made you choose the BME program at JHU over other BME programs at other universities? I know it's the undisputed #1 in the nation and everything, but what other factors played a part in your decision to choose Hopkins?


I know there's like four different "tracks" you can follow as a JHU major, but could you tell me specifically what they are? Also, are most of your classmates in the BME program premeds as well? What other career paths do they have in mind, and which are made available by majoring in BME?

How feasible is to major in BME and still minor in something else? Is the workload too much ( I'm asking you because you said you're minoring in math )? What about a hypothetical double major, such as BME and Neuroscience or any other biology-related major?

Thank you in advance for your help, and congrats on an awesome forum and blog! :)

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2012, 04:28 pm »
Hey Miguel! Glad to hear you are applying BME:

ED versus RD doesn't factor in I'm pretty sure...I applied RD and it worked out well for me! I know a lot of kids who got in ED...but I also know some kids who got in ED who weren't selected to BME. So whichever one you prefer. :)

The BME program is number one for many reasons...but the reason I came here is because of the unlimited resources the BME program has. I mean, as a freshman, I was on a design team that worked on designing and patenting a catheter for the director of endovascular neurosurgery at Hopkins Hospital...how sick is that?!?!? The other reason I chose Hopkins was no core requirements...I am SOOOOO glad I never had to sit through History 101 and got to take classes that I enjoy, like Spanish, creative writing, and theater.

There are actually five tracks now as of this year and you can check them out at http://www.bme.jhu.edu/academics/undergrad.htm/. I would say 1/3 are pre-med, 1/3 plan on pursuing engineering in a masters or PhD program, and 1/3 plan to enter the work force after graduating, mainly in engineering, but Hopkins BMEs also get a lot of consulting offers.

I'm actually going to double major in Applied Math, so I would say it is definitely easy to minor in just about anything, and especially if it fulfills your distribution requirements (like, say, Spanish). I'm double majoring without even taking any extra classes because I was able to overlap so much! BME and neuroscience... I haven't heard of anyone doing that combo, so I can't say I'm too familiar with the neuro major. I would call academic advising and see if they could answer a few questions for you. :)
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

BlancheBunny103

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2012, 08:42 pm »
Hi Sydney, how do you find BME so far? I heard it's a weed-out major, is it true? How intensive the coursework & workload?

And the classes Biological Models & Simulation and Systems & Control sound interesting, I want to have a look at their syllabi. Where can I find the syllabus for those classes? Or can you attach the syllabi?
Thanks =)

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2012, 09:54 pm »
Hey! I really think BME has been the right major for me, and have been enjoying myself. More importantly, I've become extremely proud of all I have been able to learn. Hopkins BME has brought out a lot in me that I didn't know I had! I would say a dozen or so kids drop out of the major each year (some years much more, some years no one drops). I don't think it is a weed-out major for anyone who has genuine interest in biomedical engineering; almost every person I know who dropped out didn't have their heart in engineering to begin with and just kind of tested the waters since they got accepted. That being said, it is a very challenging majpr, but there are so many outlets for help, such as free on-campus tutoring, office hours, and study groups, I've found it all to be manageable, and this is coming from a kid with no real intense computer/physics/engineering experience prior to college.

Systems & Controls has been my favorite class thus far! Dr. Miller is a FANTASTIC professor and Dr. Sarma, on top of being just generally awesome, just received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Models and Simulations was probably the hardest class I've taken at Hopkins, but it was mainly because it didn't play up my personal strengths (other kids thought it was alright). My syllabi aren't really representative of the classes' normal syllabi because one teacher was on sabbatical and another teacher for the other class was taking a leave. They also don't really tell you much about the class unless you have the book. I would recommend contacting academic advising if you are really interested in a syllabus, because they have a better chance of finding one with the usual teachers, and maybe even have a better class description.

Sorry if that didn't help too much. :-/
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/

sofi2013

  • Newbie
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #23 on: October 20, 2012, 11:59 am »
Hey, Sydney!

My name is Sofi, I am a senior from Miami, Fl. and I am very interested in the Johns Hopkins BME program. I have heard it is an incredible program though very competitive (I have even heard it described as "cutthroat"). I did not get this feeling when I visited the school in July and asked the student tour guides, but then again, I visited when classes weren't in session. I was wondering if you ever felt that the BME program was too high stakes competition wise? I was also wondering what your track within the major is. I'm interested in orthopedics as well and actually hope to become a surgeon some day! (: I know BME is a demanding major, but is it possible to double major in a subject completely unrelated to the sciences?

Next week, I'll be visiting Hopkins overnight and being interviewed!!!!  I am so excited for my stay, and I was wondering if you can recommend any classes for me to visit on Wednesday afternoon?

I hope to hear from you soon!

-Sofi

JHU_Sydney

  • Hopkins Student
Re: Meet JHU_Sydney- Elm Grove, WI
« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2012, 05:45 pm »
Hey Sofi!

Sorry I didn't respond quick enough, but the admissions office has the list of classes you are allowed to sit in on. :)

I don't think BME is too high competition wise because it it a very hard program to get into. Therefore, if you get in, it means the admissions office is 100% completely sure you can handle it. People confuse competition with ambition. In all honesty, I do most of my work in study groups, so it is definitely not cutthroat! :)

Yes, it is very possible to double major in something that isn't a science. Hopkins has no core curriculum so you just need to take distribution requirements, and these classes for another major can fulfill those. My friend, Rochelle, actually doubles BME/Spanish.
JHU_Sydney :)
Class of 2014
Biomedical Engineering major
Applied Mathematics & Statistics Major

Like to procrastinate? Read my blog! http://blogs.hopkins-interactive.com/sydney/

And then ask me some questionsssss. http://www.hopkins-interactive.com/forums/meet-the-class-of-2014/meet-jhu_sydney-elm-grove-wi/